Table of Contents

Table of Contents

This is going to be a working document showing all the apps that I use on a daily basis or just apps that I think are really cool. I thought it would be helpful to keep a list of all the apps that I consider part of my “daily carry”. These are apps that I use almost on a daily basis. This is going to be a working document, over time I will stop using some of these apps even if I still think they’re great and could be useful to you.

Todoist Logo

This is a todo application or task manager application. Quite simply it allows you to create todo lists. Todoist is incredibly versatile and it can either be very simple, or you can can make it perform complex workflows and processes. I also find this app useful because it has a two way sync with Google Calendar. It is also the back bone of my personal productivity system. 

Notion is a jack of all trades in the app world. In theory it could probably replace most of the apps in this list. I find that because its generalist it doesn’t do things like Calendar and Kanban as well as Google Calendar and Asana. It is really good for capturing notes fast and storing information in a neat and organized manner. I moved to Notion from Evernote, it took some to get used to it, but I would never go back.

Google Calendar is pretty self explanatory. It’s a Google app and I’ve always enjoyed using Google’s software. I’ve found Google Calendar to be faster and more reliable than other Calendar Applications. It also integrates remarkable well with other apps like Todoist and IFTTT.com
As I mentioned above, I am a sucker for anything Google. Gmail has been a consistently good email app for as long as I can remember. It’s intuitively basic and requires no set up and I can log into it from any computer in the world. This is great, need I say more?
Asana Logo
Asana as a personal productivity app is horrendous. Trust me I’ve tried it. However, I have been using it for over a year at work to manage my team and I have loved how easy it has made keeping track of my team’s projects, tasks and deliverables. The ubiquitous style of tasks is confusing for some, but when you create effective workflows it becomes a powerful tool.
Good Time is a minimalistic looking Pomodoro app. It allows you to adjust the intervals of sessions and breaks and works intuitively with gestures. It’s available as an andoid app which is where I personally use it. 
If you are a stat nerd like me RescueTime is for you. It tracks all your usage behaviour across all your devices as long as you have the app installed. This is great because it can tell you when you’re most productive and reveal bad habits such as excessive news reading that you may not even have been aware of. Here is an article I wrote on RescueTime

Strong is an android app that allows you to create work out templates for the gym. They have done a really good job of making sure most types of machines and exercises are already in the app. The app does a good job of customising the interface depending on what type of exercise you are doing. I am on the free version which allows you to store up to 3 workout templates. 

Strava is a social fitness app that allows you to track your ride or run. They do allow you to track other types of physical activities but the functionality is not as great. I will say that they are forever increasing the pressure to subscribe to premium which is making the app less enjoyable to me. Another great fitness analytics app is Smashrun.

Toggl is a team time tracking software. I use it to keep track of my projects for my business: CONTE. It is great at giving you reports and breaking them down by project, team member and day. With the premium version you are also able to add different values to time for different hourly rates. 

Other Apps I have used and enjoyed

  1. Bodyweight Fitness
  2. Smart Audiobook reader
  3. Forest
  4. Tiny Gain